Detailed ridership map released for GO and UP Express stations

Haven’t seen this map before so cool to see! #gotransit

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Ridership increased to 52.5 million in November – Find where you and your neighbours fit.

More customers than ever before are bee-lining it to Barrie via GO Transit, or stops along its line, according to the latest ridership numbers released this week by Metrolinx.

The transit agency saw ridership on GO Transit and the UP Express jump to 52.5 million from April to November last year. Barrie GO train corridor saw the strongest growth of the entire GO network at 21 per cent, compared to the same time the year before.

The numbers are part of a detailed map Metrolinx has now released, breaking down ridership across the Greater Golden Horseshoe region. Take a look at how your local station compared.

click right here for the ridership map

“With our renewed focus to put the customers first, our team is increasing service to help provide new reasons for our customers…

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A 1990 @gotransit schedule #gotransit @Metrolinx

It can be interesting to look back a few years, in this case 19, and see how much has changed. An April 1990 GO Transit schedule provides many examples. Since 1990 routes have been extended, new stations built, more train service added at all times of the day, and the beginning of weekend service on a non-Lakeshore Line. There’s the promise of even more service in future years, and electrification through the #GOExpansion program.

This schedule also makes reference to “SKYDOME”. The railfan in me also appreciations the notation on if the GO line uses a CN Rail line (“CN”) or CP Rail line (“CP”).

Thanks to my friend Damian Baranowski posting a copy of this schedule and sharing here with permission.

(click on the images to expand)

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Metrolinx transit officers pull Toronto man from tracks on Christmas Day

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Just one of many lost and vulnerable souls returned, almost daily, to worried families.

When74-year-old Shirley Lee was found safe on Wednesday night, two days after she went missing from her Scarborough home on Christmas Eve, searchers and Toronto residents breathed a sigh of relief.

Officials used everything from horses to drones as they combed corners of the city for the woman diagnosed with Alzheimer’s. At one point, Metrolinx stopped trains to help in the search.

The story captivated the city – especially as she was missing over the holidays.

But her family was not alone in their worry for a lost and vulnerable loved one on Christmas Day.

Nor were they alone in seeing a safe return of a lost soul.

On Christmas morning, a confused and disorientated elderly man tried to find his way to his downtown Toronto home – and instead wandered out onto active tracks used…

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Exclusive. GOing Loco for GO’s new Tier 4 Locomotives

Great to have been able to tweet out a picture by Hunter Holmes and have it in the latest Metrolinx blog.

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Reporter diary – A rare behind-the-scenes look at GO’s mighty new machines

Next to locomotive 675, everything else seems very small.

And I’m suddenly six years old ago, and dearly want to sound the train horn – if I could only find it.

As it waits at the Willowbrook train yard, located just west of Toronto’s Mimico station, it’s hard not be awed by the power of one of GO’s new Tier 4 workhorses.

Even by locomotive standards, the new generation of passenger train engines are behemoths. The MotivePower built locomotives are a staggering 129,000 kilograms – that’s equal to the weight of about 71 average cars – stand an imposing 4.7 meters from rail to roof and are longer than an articulated bus.

675 One of the new Tier 4 locomotives. Yes, you’ll want one in your driveway. (Photo by Matt Llewellyn)

Rail fanatics and fans have been sending our…

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Bridges from the past restored for better transit in the future

Happy to have been quoted for this. Mentioned the wedding and my grandparents.

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After nine weekends of work, the Lakeshore West bridge project is finally over.

The giant blue cranes are gone.

And that signals relief for both the Lakeshore West line and GO Transit customers – as we say ‘thank you for your patience’ during the historic work.

If you traveled along the train corridor on weekends this fall, you saw the congestion that comes with a mammoth construction project. The vital line was being worked on around the clock as crews put in a total of 40,000 combined work hours to bring new life to several century-old bridges and overpasses, some dating back to the Grand Trunk Railway era.

That Grand Trunk was once considered the largest railway in the world, and was the chief line between Montreal and Toronto.

Work involved restoration of six century-old bridges between Mimico and Exhibition GO, including the Humber River Bridge, which weighs 7,000 tonnes…

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Training for transit independence in Ontario

Great to see this.

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Metrolinx participates in Community Access to Transportation program for people with developmental disabilities.

On a brisk autumn morning, a very bundled up Carmen Farrugia waits patiently at a bus stop in downtown Hamilton. He’s wearing a bright red jacket and is standing on the sidewalk a few feet back from the curb.

As the bus approaches, Farrugia waits for the vehicle to come to a complete stop before stepping on board and tapping his PRESTO card. He greets the bus driver with a big smile and then strategically finds a seat close to the front.

While this process likely seems routine for most people who take public transit, for Farrugia, this trip is actually the result of months of practise – and has been methodically planned out.

Carmen for Blog Carmen Farrugia is one of more than 1,500 people in Hamilton who have now completed the Community Access to Transportation travel training course. Photo by…

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Lakeshore West bridge work nears completion

Includes a great sunset picture.

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Stunning video and photos of bridge construction along the Lakeshore West Corridor show some incredible engineering feats and indicate service disruptions will soon be coming to an end.

They’ve been working around the clock on weekends to bring life to century-old bridges and transform rail corridors for future GO Transit service expansion.

Construction crews have made significant progress along Lakeshore West and, while nearing completion, have been delighted to see history before their eyes. The work has included the removal of a 107-year-old bridge span, the rehabilitation of existing bridge piers and other parts that are more than 130 years old. For many of the crew members, the work is like a time capsule.

“It is fascinating to see how bridge construction methods have changed over time” said Michael Szewczyk, a project coordinator who’s been involved with the bridge work on the Lakeshore West Corridor.

For Szewczyk and his team…

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